10.15.2014 / Concrete for the Little

Yesterday, once I finished sealing a bit of Ardex (and my hands in the process) I made a dresser delivery for a special little lady.

Little Miss Lyla, my new niece, is a whopping 4 days old and has cheeks for days.

Lila and Lisa

And she’s the reason that I played with Ardex.

Ardex topped dresser

This is a very unofficial before and after since I clearly ran out of daylight by the time I delivered the dresser and didn’t have my good camera on me.  I’ll give you a quality before and after with more detail and steps very soon but I was dieing to share.

If you remember the dresser that I started with:

lyla dresser before

Very solid with nice detail… except the top.  The top was a product of its age, and although the rest was wood with dovetailed drawers, the top was laminate with plastic edging.  Even if I got it to hold paint, I doubt the paint would hold up in a kid’s room.  Which is what lead me to consider Ardex Feather Finish, like I posted about previously.  If concrete can’t hold up to kids, then I don’t know what would.

Lyla dresser

It was applied directly onto the existing top kind of like icing a cake, so the concrete is only a fraction of an inch thick.  I sealed it with concrete sealer so it will stand strong and be stain resistant.  The jury is still out about the final result.  I probably went a little heavy with my first coat which made it more difficult to get an even edge.  But I don’t hate it! (isn’t that always the goal with projects?  Not to hate it)

 

I do love the finish that I was able to get on the body of the dresser.  I used my handy dandy Critter Sprayer and the finish looks like it could have been done by a factory.  If the top had been real wood, I would have refinished it and left that wood as a contrast, but alas, so with the Ardex, I just accomplished the contrast in another way.

Lyla dresser

The room color looks a little wonky in this light, but it’s a delightful shade of light yellow that you may have gotten a glimpse of on instagram.

calla lily bm paint

Now that the ball is rolling and Little Miss is leaving the drama at the hospital, hopefully the room will come together quickly!

So, tell me- do you agree with my Mom that I’m nuts to put a concrete topped dresser in a little girls nursery?

Lyla dresser

 

 

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08.27.2014 / Sofa!!

The excitement really only needs a one word title.  After 3+ years of lamenting our too-large-for-the-living-room lumpy (but oh so comfy) couch….

Living room before with out of scale furniture

We finally have a sexy adult sofa that will hold up for more than a couple years.  The word ‘sofa’ just sounds so much more sophisticated than ‘couch,’ don’t you think?

MGBW Diane's Sofa via Year of Serendipity

We splurged for the Diane’s sofa from Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams in the stock velvet (aka unable to be ruined by little kitty paws), and I.am.in.love.

Living room with new  stylish but neutral sofa via via Year of Serendipity

I’m also so amazingly happy with how far the living room has come this year!  From the highly artistic and totally accurately perspectived sketch that I showed you back in January, I think I can say- mission accomplished.

Living room plan sketch

Living room sketch turned reality via Year of Serendipity

All the puzzle pieces have finally come together and I’m giddy!  Just a few last finishing touches needed *coughpillowsandrugcough* and I will soon be able to put the Done(ish) stamp on this room.  When is a room in my house ever fully done?  Well, done enough to take some new pics for my Home Tour.

Living room with new  stylish but neutral sofa via via Year of Serendipity

Hubby’s still rather neutral on pretty new Diane- I think because the color is almost identical to our old one, but OMG, I personally think having the right scaled sofa for the space is a breath of fresh air!!

eclectic living room with stylish but neutral sofa via via Year of Serendipity

Since my sketched out plans in January, the living room has gotten:

So, are you as in love with Diane as I am??

 

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08.15.2014 / DIY 101: Recovering a Chair

Let’s start at the very beginning- a very good place to start.  When you read you begin with A B C, when you DIY you begin with…

recovering a dining chair.

diy-101-dining-seat before

I know I often do more involved DIY’s but sometimes I forget to share the basics.  So I figured let’s start with DIY 101.

Recovering a chair can seem intimidating to start off, but once you realize how easy it is to recover the seat, you’ll want to keep doing it!  Maybe that’s the root of my chair addiction.  As you can probably guess with this chair, I’ve already attacked it with a vibrant blue spray paint.  No matter what color the frame, however, that orange velour seat would need to go.  Far away.

First you need to remove the seat.  Normally it’s held on with a few screws from under the chair.

DIY 101: How to Recover a Dining Chair via Year of Serendipity

Once your seat is free, go ahead and grab pliers and a flat-head screwdriver and start prying out the old staples.  If your seat is in decent condition and the cushion is still adequate, you can always skip this and cover right over the old fabric.  If that’s the case, skip down to the fabric step.

DIY 101: How to Recover a Dining Chair via Year of Serendipity

You’ll need to take the staples out to free both the fabric and the underlying foam.  I promise, this is the most tedious part, so if you can make it through this- you got it!

DIY 101: How to Recover a Dining Chair via Year of Serendipity

Now for the fun part- putting it all back together!

I used 2 layers of dacron batting for my cushion.  If you want something squishier, you can use a layer of 1″ foam with a layer of batting over it to smooth it.

DIY 101: How to Recover a Dining Chair via Year of Serendipity

Start by stapling the top, bottom and 2 sides about 1″ in from the edge.

DIY 101: How to Recover a Dining Chair via Year of Serendipity

DIY 101: How to Recover a Dining Chair via Year of Serendipity

After stapling the 4 sides, go ahead and staple all the way around and trim the excess batting.

Next you’ll need to position your cushion on the back of your fabric.  Make sure if you have a directional pattern like a geometric or stripe, that you have the pattern oriented as you’d like to see it on the chair.

DIY 101: How to Recover a Dining Chair via Year of Serendipity

Now, with the fabric, you’ll want to first staple the 4 sides as before.  Staple in just a bit from where you stapled the foam so that the fabric will cover it.

DIY 101: How to Recover a Dining Chair via Year of Serendipity

Once you have the sides stapled, work inward from each staple.  You want to make sure not to pull the fabric tight otherwise you’ll see the stretching.  Instead, use your full hand to smooth the fabric tight like so.

DIY 101: How to Recover a Dining Chair via Year of Serendipity

 

Create pleats in your fabric as necessary as you go.  You won’t see these on the finished product, but it will help your pattern sit properly.

DIY 101: How to Recover a Dining Chair via Year of Serendipity

Continue this all the way around until your entire seat is stapled.

DIY 101: How to Recover a Dining Chair via Year of Serendipity

Once the stapling is set, trim your fabric at least a half inch from the staples- any closer and your fabric may fray.

DIY 101: How to Recover a Dining Chair via Year of Serendipity

Once trimmed, you get to turn the cushion back over an admire your handy-work.

DIY 101: How to Recover a Dining Chair via Year of Serendipity

Reattach it to the chair and enjoy the fruits of your labor!

DIY 101: How to Recover a Dining Chair via Year of Serendipity

See, that wasn’t so hard, was it?

DIY 101: How to Recover a Dining Chair via Year of Serendipity

DIY 101: How to Recover a Dining Chair via Year of Serendipity

Now you’re ready to give your dining room a whole new look!

 

 

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